NCAA goes back to court, defending its amateurism rules

The NCAA will be back in court Tuesday, defending its amateurism rules against plaintiffs who say capping compensation at the value of a scholarship violates federal antitrust law.

The claim against the NCAA and the 11 conferences that have participated at the highest level of college football was originally brought by former West Virginia football player Shawne Alston. It later merged with similar lawsuits, including a notable case brought by former Clemson football player Martin Jenkins.

Plaintiffs say the NCAA illegally restricts schools from compensating football and basketball players beyond what is traditionally covered by a scholarship. That includes tuition, room and board and books, plus a cost of attendance stipend to cover incidentals such as travel. The plaintiffs want compensation to be determined by each conference in hopes of creating a free market.

The NCAA counters that altering amateurism rules would lead to pay-for-play, fundamentally damaging college sports and harming academic integration of athletes.

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Categories: Sports

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